3 Paths to Personal Motivation at Work

by Chris Dardis

Call it lack of sunshine or the post-holiday sugar crash, but know you’re not alone in that mid-winter slump. No matter how you got into the slump, it’s time to change it up! Versique’s HR executive search and consulting team has been discussing what keeps us motivated on a daily basis. Check out what Jenny Kriha , Chris Dardis, and Caitlin Goodwin say keeps them moving forward!

 

Do You Take the Stairs? (Jenny Kriha)

What motivates me is watching those around me excel, even in the seemingly small things. I recently saw one of my coworkers walking up the stairs instead of taking the elevator (we’re on the 9th floor) and, call me competitive, I wanted to jump in!

While it seems like a simple change, I likely never would have taken on the personal challenge (in heels nonetheless) had I not first seen my coworker making such a healthy decision. So far, I’ve been taking the stairs to our 9th floor office at least once a day. Even though we’re not climbing the IDS Tower, it really gets your heart pumping and now I start off every morning with an accomplishment that motivates me to conquer the rest of the day.

It’s truly amazing how the simplest challenges filter into other areas of your life. I am checking things off my to-do list left and right, and stepping outside of my comfort zone to achieve more – all because of a few flights of stairs and a good attitude. Don’t underestimate the trickledown effect!

 

Are You Motivated By Your Boss’s Belief In You? (Chris Dardis)

Motivation drives our behavior is some pretty unique ways. What does “motivation” really mean? Why do we desire to do the things we do? What’s my motivation? After delving into these questions, I realized that motivation is the driving force behind not only what we do, but why we want to do it.

Pinning down my personal motivation was another challenge altogether. It took a lot of reflection to realize that my motivation revolves around the trust I have earned in those around me. I want to work hard and do good things for those who believe in me. I love a good pep talk as much as the next person, but I’ve always been more motivated by wanting to produce or please someone because they trust and believe in the person/professional I am.

Working alongside teammates who respect me, working with clients who trust me, and working for leaders that believe in me – now THAT’S my kind of place.

 

Does Your Attitude and Performance Affect Your Company’s Success? (Caitlin Goodwin)

We work in an industry of ups and downs – recruiting is anything but boring! I’ve found that with such peaks and valleys, it’s important to develop a personal mantra to ride out the waves. Call it a “motivational road-map,” if you will. When I reflect on my personal motivators at work, I find myself relying on my commitment to our values of collaboration, continuous improvement, competition (results-driven), and community engagement. My coworkers are such a fantastic representation of these values in our workplace – on days when I feel I’ve hit a roadblock, I look to the examples I see in action each and every day at Versique.

As I look ahead to what Versique hopes to accomplish as a company in 2015 and beyond, I’ve found that sharing common goals and aspirations increases my personal level of motivation at work. I’m fortunate enough to work for a company that wants to do big things on a big scale – and understands the importance of investing in its employees to make that a reality. Knowing that my company’s success depends partially on my personal commitment to our core values and long-term goals, keeps me accountable and drives my motivation year-round.

So, what keeps you motivated? Is it actions of your coworkers? The values and aspirations of your company? Perhaps the trust others have in you? Tell us in the comments below!

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